Rollin' Rollin' Rollin', Keep that Concrete Rollin'

There’s a lot of coordination and some pretty cool equipment that goes into pouring a bridge deck. Here you can see the machine that levels and texturizes the concrete (yellow structure), as well as the device that delivers the wet concrete (green pipe). Photo courtesy of Ceccanti, Inc.

There’s a lot of coordination and some pretty cool equipment that goes into pouring a bridge deck. Here you can see the machine that levels and texturizes the concrete (yellow structure), as well as the device that delivers the wet concrete (green pipe). Photo courtesy of Ceccanti, Inc.

It’s been a couple weeks since we’ve checked in on the River ‘S’ Bridge here on the blog. The good news is that the project keeps humming along and has hit another milestone - all four bridge span decks have now been poured.

If you’re the kind of person who goes to hockey games for the intermissions so you can watch the Zamboni driver, this may just be your favorite part of the project. I’ll let you take a moment to be mesmerized by the action captured in this video:

A Hard Working Machine

The machine in the video above performs a number of functions. After the concrete is poured, this machine contours the concrete while giving it a slight crown in the center (to drain water to the curbs), while it also screeds (levels) the concrete flat and then textures it.

A Rewarding View

Getting to this point required a lot of rebar tying throughout all four bridge spans, and a lot of concrete pouring. Some early morning work was called for, but it seemed like the weather cooperated and the sunrise was worth the early work hours. (photos courtesy of Ceccanti, Inc.)

What Lies Ahead

In addition to the deck work, the crew has been working on the embankments at each end of the bridge. This involves filling and grading dirt and placing concrete rubble.

Over the next couple of weeks, there’s more concrete work to be done. The crew will be doing “closure pours” at the piers. These closure pours occur at the top of each pier cap and fill the gap between each deck span.