Capping Off Some Great Progress

Crews remove the center span of the existing bridge to barge in a crane to work on the new bridge. Did you even know the old bridge could do that?! Don’t worry about driving across it on the weekends, though. The old bridge was designed to have the center span removed for large vessels to pass.

Crews remove the center span of the existing bridge to barge in a crane to work on the new bridge. Did you even know the old bridge could do that?! Don’t worry about driving across it on the weekends, though. The old bridge was designed to have the center span removed for large vessels to pass.

It’s been a very busy couple of weeks since our last update. The River ‘S’ Bridge crew has been focused on completing the piers, an important part of the bridge’s “substructure” (for those who read our post from June 5th).

Two weeks ago, the crew finished the piers for abutment 2. This is the land-based end of the bridge on the railroad side of Lake River. The work involved drilling 5-foot shafts, setting rebar cages, and pouring concrete. Meanwhile, carpenters began building concrete forms that would be used to create the pier caps.

Last week, concrete was poured at nearly every primary work location. Two of the piers received their caps, while another pier’s column was poured along with one of the abutments. In preparation for the concrete, crews had create reinforcement cages at the abutment, and rebar was tied for the pier caps. The cap for one of the abutments will be the focus this week.

Crews pick up the rebar cage for placement in the drilled shaft for abutment 2 on the railroad side of the bridge.

Crews pick up the rebar cage for placement in the drilled shaft for abutment 2 on the railroad side of the bridge.

A crane delivers rebar to a pier cap.

A crane delivers rebar to a pier cap.

Representatives from FHWA and Ciccanti, Inc. use a lift to inspect rebar work on the pier caps.

Representatives from FHWA and Ciccanti, Inc. use a lift to inspect rebar work on the pier caps.

Concrete being pumped into a pier form.

Concrete being pumped into a pier form.